Weekly Links & Thoughts #171

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET),  just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

  • Where Humans Meet Machines: Intuition, Expertise and Learning (medium.com, 2)
    What Daniel Kahneman, behavioral economist, psychologist and Nobel Prize winner, thinks about algorithms making decisions. Probably unsurprisingly for those who have read his book “Thinking, fast and slow”, he worries more about human decision making  than algorithmic one. (medium.com, 2)
  • Fascism is back. Blame the Internet. (washingtonpost.com, 2)
    Heavy headline, but an opinion piece which resonated with me. Currently I see a 20 % probability that the internet (or rather what it does to and with people) eventually will lead to a turning away from the principles of the enlightenment, a collapse of modern civilization and a time akin to the Middle Ages. Notably, this also means that I consider it still more likely that humanity will find ways to constructively deal with the networked age. I hope. Yet, it’s very clear that on an aggregate level, the consequences of the internet are posing quite a challenge to humanity and the still pretty primitive and easily mislead (collective, tribal) human mind.
  • How a Pentagon Contract Became an Identity Crisis for Google (nytimes.com, 2)
    Google wants to work with the Pentagon in the field of AI and considers this type of partnership necessary for competitive reasons, but a significant number of Google employees hate the idea. According to this article, the internal debates are even more heated than those following the infamous “Google memo” last year.
  • AI winter is well on its way (blog.piekniewski.info, 3)
    Whether there will be another AI winter or not: Currently, an increasing number of experts in the field of artificial intelligence appear to become disappointed with the pace of progress within the field.
  • Machine learning is helping computers spot arguments online before they happen (theverge.com, 2)
    I want this technology for real conversations. As a locally run app (for privacy reasons) on a phone or smartwatch which alerts people if a conversation that they are having is turning tense. This could help save many relationships and marriages.
  • Spotify’s Censorship Crisis is About Social Responsibility (musicindustryblog.wordpress.com, 2)
    How should music streaming services and other content platforms deal with editorial choices in regards to social responsbility? It’s not easy, as shown by Spotify’s recent controversy surrounding the removal of artists such as R. Kelly from its playlists.
  • Would You Have Hired Steve Jobs? (medium.com, 2)
    Thought-provoking question. Many probably would not have. But maybe even rightly so. Some people are not made to be employees.
  • The Beginning of the Future (howwegettonext.com, 2)
    A delightful collection of visual art created over the past couple of centuries depicting the future.
  • The Birth And Death Of Privacy: 3,000 Years of History Told Through 46 Images (medium.com, 3)
    Another historical visual trip, equally enlightening. At the end of it, it’s hard not to see how privacy probably will turn out to have been a very temporary phenomenon (at least for the masses).
  • Indistractable: How to Focus In and Tune Out Digital Distraction (medium.com, 2)
    Nir Eyal has performed quite an impressive personal pivot: From the guy who taught app developers how to make users “hooked” to the guy who teaches users how to stop being so hooked. Like the drug dealer who later opens a rehab clinic.
  • Why Startup Timing is Everything (medium.com, 2)
    On the importance of the right timing to be successful with a startup.
  • The Rise of the Muslim Woman Tech Entrepreneur (nytimes.com, 2)
    Some interesting numbers in this piece detailing the unusual high number of women in traditionally male tech sectors in some Muslim-majority countries.
  • Go Ahead, Skip that Networking Event (hbr.org, 2)
    The author reviewed dozens of studies on networking and the overall implications are that networking events don’t live up to their billing.
  • Unquantified (nomasters.io, 2)
    Not quantifying anything is my default state (ok sometimes I check how many kilometers I walked during a day, but it’s not essential – one can always make a fairly accurate guess), and I am happy with it. But maybe the older I get, the more I’ll be realizing the benefits of monitoring certain body data. I am not ruling that out.
  • Desperate for jobs, Venezuelan immigrants turn to ride-hailing services across Latin America (techcrunch.com, 2)
    How on-demand ride-hailing services benefit from the Venezuelan crisis. I’m currently in Colombia and here, most Uber drivers seem to be locals. But according to the article, it’s different in other countries of the region.
  • Why The Heck Is Bird Potentially Worth $1B? (news.crunchbase.com, 2)
    The latest tech fad in the U.S. are electric scooters. Investors seem to love this new smart mobility niche, but so far, the economic performance of the leading startup in that field, Bird, looks rather modest.
  • Estonia plans to become a free public transport nation (popupcity.net, 1)
    Certainly “free” public transport is not really free, it’s paid for through taxes. Still, it’s great to see that this seems to work out well for Tallinn (and Estonia).

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #170

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET),  just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #169

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET),  just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Recently on meshedsociety.com:

Podcast episode of the week:

Quotation of the week:

  • “The Cambridge Analytica scandal was in some ways a sustained advertisement for the idea that targeted ads really work and that Facebook really is a space where people can be molded rather than persuaded.”
    Rob Horning in “Anxiety of Influence(reallifemag.com, 2)

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #168

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET),  just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Service of the week:

Quotation of the week:

  • “In a loose sense, WeWork’s business model is getting SoftBank to buy beer for software workers.”
    Matt Levine in “WeWork Accounts for Consciousness” (bloomberg.com, 2)

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #167

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET),  just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Recently on meshedsociety.com:

Podcast episode of the week:

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #166

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET),  just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Podcast episode of the week:

Quotation of the week:

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #165

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET), just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

  • Why it’s as hard to escape an echo chamber as it is to flee a cult (aeon.co, 3)
    Possibly the best thing I’ve read on the topic of filter bubbles and echo chambers – two terms that are often used interchangeably. In this essay the philosophy professor C Thi Nguyen explains the crucial difference: Filter bubbles (or as he calls them, epistemic bubbles) happen when people don’t have access to different viewpoints and facts. This phenomenon is less common than widely assumed. Echo chambers on the other hand are social structures from which other relevant voices have been actively discredited. In echo chambers, there usually is no lack of access to different view points or facts – but there is no trust in them. This is why just throwing more facts at people in echo chambers does not work. Nguyen also offers a very helpful check: “Does a community’s belief system actively undermine the trustworthiness of any outsiders who don’t subscribe to its central dogmas? Then it’s probably an echo chamber.”
  • An Apology for the Internet — From the Architects Who Built It (nymag.com, 3+)
    What went wrong with the internet? Why did many of its lofty promises didn’t come true, whereas an ugly side of it has emerged that no one expected? A bunch of early internet architects and leading figures offer their critical and partly self-critical views.
  • The Price of Free is Actually Too High (feld.com, 1)
    Hard to make an objective statement here, but it seems reasonable to state that there should be a cap to the price of free.
  • The Half-Life of Danger: The Truth Behind the Tesla Model X Crash (thedrive.com, 3)
    Smart analysis of the uncanny valley of automated driving, where understanding it requires a level of driver training equivalent to that of pilots. You also find some really funky matrices in here.
  • When algorithms surprise us (aiweirdness.com, 2)
    When machine learning algorithms solve entirely different problems from the ones the programmer intended.
  • Inside the Jordan refugee camp that runs on blockchain (technologyreview.com, 3)
    Critics say one might easily just use a traditional database. But there is something to the idea of owning and controlling one’s data, and for this, a blockchain is presumably the more feasible approach.
  • Post-Authenticity and the Ironic Truths of Meme Culture (medium.com, 3)
    A thought-provoking attempt to connect contemporary phenomena and trends such as fake news, authenticity, irony and memes.
  • Want to feel unique? Believe in the reptile people (aeon.co, 2)
    Why do some people believe in extreme conspiracy theories? It might be because of a deep-seated need for uniqueness.
  • Consumers don’t need experts to interpret 23andMe genetic risk reports (statnews.com, 1)
    Anne Wojcicki, the CEO and co-founder of 23andMe, a company that has pioneered providing accessible consumer DNA tests, believes that people don’t need a medical professional nearby when learning about genetic risks. In a recent essay, Mikaela Pitcan pointed out though that the reaction towards learning about risks differs significantly from person to person.
  • How to save your privacy from the Internet’s clutches (techcrunch.com, 3)
    A comprehensive list of tips to escape “surveillance capitalism”.
  • The New Octopus (logicmag.io, 3)
    What to do when corporate entities become too big and too powerful? The recipes of the past don’t necessarily work anymore with today’s new giants.
  • The Paradox of Universal Basic Income (wired.com, 2)
    Joi Ito with a very nuanced take on the UBI.
  • World After Capital: Scarcity (continuations.com, 2)
    How scarcity has shifted over time from food to land to capital and is now shifting to attention.
  • Duolingo Suddenly Has Over Twice As Much Language Learning Material (fastcompany.com, 2)
    I’d call Duolingo one of the best, most beneficial commercial web services in existence. Recently a cab driver in Colombia told me that he learned English through Duolingo and by subsequently talking with passengers. There must be hundreds of thousands, if not millions of similar cases.
  • The axes of HomePod evolution: don’t judge what you can’t yet see (theoverspill.blog, 2)
    Every major Apple product has been an MVP (minimal viable product) when it first hit the market and gradually received missing features and services. HomePod most likely is no exception.
  • A Big Phone (mattgemmell.com, 2)
    Attempts to use an iPad as a notebook replacement have been a thing ever since the iPad was introduced. Reading this makes me wonder if now maybe is the point at which this actually could work without too many sacrifices.
  • Why New York City Stopped Building Subways (citylab.com, 3)
    Insane if you think about it: “Since December 16, 1940, New York has not opened another new subway line“.

Quotation of the week:

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #163

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET), just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #162

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET), just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend.

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Recently on meshedsociety.com:

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.

Weekly Links & Thoughts #161

Here is this week’s issue of meshedsociety.com weekly, loaded with interesting analyses and essays, significant yet under-reported information bits as well as thoughtful opinion pieces from the digital and technology world. Usually published every Wednesday/Thursday (CET), just in time so you have something good to read over the weekend (but temporarily on a slightly irregular schedule).

======
If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection, sign up for free for the weekly email. Here is an archive of previous issues.
======

Reading time indicator: 1 = up to 3 minutes, 2 = 4 to 9 minutes, 3 = 10 to 29 minutes , 3+ = 30 minutes or more
Note: Some of the publications may use “soft” paywalls. If you are denied access, open the URL in your browser’s incognito/private mode (or subscribe if you find yourself reading a lot of the content on a specific site and want to support it).

Quotation of the week:

  • “It is human preferences, not machines, that are unpredictable and incomparable, as well they should be. For coordinating our interactions with strangers, impartial automata are often crucial.”
    Nick Szabo in “Things as authorities“, back in 2006. (unenumerated.blogspot.com)

Thanks for reading! If you want to make sure not to miss this link selection in the future, sign up for free for the weekly email.